Natural Alternatives to Hydroxychloroquine 2021

Hydroxychloroquine, a less toxic derivative of Chloroquine is a widely used medication by people with lupus or arthritis. It was first approved in the 1950s. 

Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is not effective when used very late with high dosages over a long period (RECOVERY/SOLIDARITY), effectiveness improves with earlier usage and improved dosing. Early treatment consistently shows positive effects. Negative evaluations typically ignore treatment time, often focusing on a subset of late stage studies.

As of June, 2021 there have been 29 studies of Hydroxychloroquine for early treatment – all with zero negative results for the most serious outcome reported. The average risk reduction for the most serious outcome reported in these trials was 65%. Here’s a chart from c19hcq.com that shows this: 



According to Steve Kirsch (published on TrialSiteNews):

Skeptics might argue the reason all the studies are positive is that journals are more likely to publish positive results than negative results. But in fact, there is a good argument that the bias is the reverse for HCQ, where negative studies are more likely to be published than positive studies. But in this case, those arguments don’t matter as the skeptics can’t point to a negative early treatment trial that has not been published so the debate is moot.

Now, let’s talk safety. HCQ is on the WHO list of essential medicines, i.e., one of the safest and most effective drugs in a health system

Lupus patients are put on HCQ and remain on the drug for life. The drug was FDA-approved more than 65 years ago. In 2016, it was the 135th most-prescribed medication in the United States, with more than 4 million prescriptions. Dose escalation studies in lupus patients and in rheumatoid arthritis patients established that 800 mg per day for life and 1,200 mg per day for 6 weeks are extremely well-tolerated.

The WHO says HCQ is safe to take for autoimmune diseases or malaria. However, they admit that there is weak evidence supporting their contention that HCQ is unsafe to take for COVID. But the problem with this is 1) they admit that the certainty of the evidence is “low” to “very low” and 2) they don’t break it out by the disease phase. We are interested in early treatment, not late treatment. You can’t just lump all the studies into one analysis.

In order to see what is actually happening in early treatment patients when they take HCQ, I reached out to Brian Tyson and George Fareed, whose practice has used HCQ in treating more than 6,000 people of all ages with COVID. The risk of diarrhea and nausea/vomiting claimed by the WHO is both “very rare and very minimal.” In general, diarrhea is more likely to be caused by COVID than the drug. 

Fareed said he has had “zero cardiac issues” with any patients. They have never had any reason to drop HCQ from their treatment protocol and I don’t know of any physician in the US who has a lower rate of hospitalization for COVID than Tyson and Fareed. If the WHO is right, then how do they explain this anomaly? Tyson and Fareed certainly didn’t get lucky on 6,000 patients and the average age of their patients is 60 years old. 

So the bottom line so far is 29 studies all positive, and real-world evidence on thousands of cases is also consistent with the studies. Our hypothesis that the drug is effective is consistent with the data. But the WHO and NIH say we should not use this drug, yet have no plausible explanation for the consistently positive data. 

Some scientists will cite the HCQ analysis published in Nature which definitively shows that HCQ is harmful. But that was a meta analysis, which heavily weighted studies of high dose HCQ given to very late stage hospitalized patients. No early treatment outpatient trials were included. The paper says “Findings have unclear generalizability to outpatients, children, pregnant women, and people with comorbidities.” I agree! 

I’m not arguing for high dose HCQ in late-stage hospitalized patients. That’s a losing proposition. As you can clearly see, all the early treatment results are all positive (top graph) whereas if you look at all stages, that’s when the negative results occur, so it is very important to pay attention to segregating the data when doing meta-analyses.


Here’s a simple analogy as to why drug timing makes a huge difference: a small bucket of water works great if the fire is small (early stage). After the house burns down, the same bucket of water will do nothing to repair the damage, even if we increase the amount of water, and will probably further damage any remains.
  
Other scientists might reference the fact that the FDA revoked the EUA on HCQ, but the revocation was based on studies on hospitalized patientsnot outpatients. So that argument doesn’t hold water.
 
  
Finally, some people may reference the Skipper study, an outpatient HCQ early treatment trial that concluded that “hydroxychloroquine did not substantially reduce symptom severity in outpatients with early, mild COVID-19.” I know a few things about that particular study because I was one of the “private donors” who funded it. The summary means that the study was underpowered, not that the drug didn’t work. Indeed, if you look at each metric they looked at, the cohort who got the HCQ always did better. See this analysis for detailsThere is much more to this study that will come out later that will show that HCQ works even better than the 51.7% drop in hospitalization rate reported in the paper. 

In short, HCQ is both effective and safe for early treatment at dosages of 600mg per day and more. If anyone tells you otherwise, please ask them for both clinical studies and real-world evidence to back up their claim.

Natural Alternatives to Hydroxychloroquine

If hydroxychloroquine could stop the virus, was this because the medications act as zinc ionophores? If so, its begs the question, “Do other zinc ionophores do the same thing?”

In the event that you simply cannot get hydroxychloroquine, quercetin, EGCG and zinc supplements are viable natural alternatives. 

Quercetin

Dietary Sources

Quercetins are naturally occurring flavonoids. These flavonoids are found in a variety of foods, including vegetables such as onions, garlic, brassica, mustard greens, and ginger; fruit such as apples, berries, and grapes; and many seeds, nuts, flowers bark and tea leaves. 

Quercetin as a Zinc Ionophore

Quercetin is a zinc ionophore (J Agric Food Chem. 2014). A 2015 study found that that Quercetin shows inhibitory activity in the early stages of a wide range of influenza viruses, including H1N1 and H5N1 (Viruses 2016). Although influenza is not in the same family of viruses as the coronavirus, it’s plausible that a similar mechanism could apply here. There is actually some evidence that Quercetin has already proven effective at treating Ebola and Zika viruses.

Quercetin Dosage

The FLCCC I-MASK+ protocol recommends 250 mg daily for prevention and 250 mg twice daily for early treatment.

Quercetin works best when taken with vitamin C and Bromelain, as vitamin C helps activate it and bromelain helps with the absorption.

Precaution: Quercetin should be used with caution in patients with hypothyroidism (low thyroid hormone) and relevant thyroid hormone levels should be monitored.

 

Effect of QCT, EGCG, and CQ on the uptake of zinc cations by liposomes. Zinc-dependent fluorescence emission of FluoZin-3 encapsulated within liposomes treated with zinc cations, polyphenols, and CQ (J Agric Food Chem. 2014).

Epigallocatechin 3-Gallate (EGCG)

EGCG is a catechin found primarily in green tea and touted as the most effective chemopreventive polyphenol (19). A study (J Agric Food Chem. 2014) found EGCG amplified the effectiveness of Quercetin as a zinc ionophore. This suggests that ECGC and Quercetin provide a synergistic effect with enhanced bioavailability.

A new in-vitro study posted to BioRxiv (June 21, 2021), provided evidence of the potential of green tea catechin against COVID-19 virus.

EGCG Dosage

The Zelenko protocol recommends 400 mg once a day for prevention and 400 mg twice daily for early treatment taken together with zinc.
A common question, “Will drinking green tea provide enough ECGC?” No, you cannot get enough only from drinking green tea. Get your hands on the standardised supplement form.

Zinc

This trace element is essential to to cell function and involved in over 100 enzymes. Zinc has long been tauted for it’s potential to support the immune system, but also plays an important role in wound healing, fertility, preventing and treating pneumonia and preserving community between neurons (memory).The National Institutes of Health (NIH) states:

“Zinc is involved in numerous aspects of cellular metabolism. It is required for the catalytic activity of approximately 100 enzymes and it plays a role in immune function, protein synthesis, wound healing, DNA synthesis, and cell division. Zinc also supports normal growth and development during pregnancy, childhood, and adolescence and is required for proper sense of taste and smell.”

Zinc Form and Dosage

There are several types of zinc supplements. Supplements contain several forms of zinc, including zinc gluconate, zinc citrate and zinc picolinate. The percentage of elemental zinc varies by form. To find out the percentage of elemental zinc in each form, check out elemental zinc percentage.
Chelated zinc is a general form of supplementary zinc in which the zinc is chelated — or bound — to a compound to make it easier for the body to absorb. Zinc picolinate or zinc gluconate are formed when zinc is chelated to picolinic acid or gluconic acid, so the main difference between zinc gluconate and picolinate is what compound it is bound to.

To find out which zinc supplement to consider, check out best zinc supplement 2021.

Most people do not lack an intake of zinc, but in disease state, there might be an increase in demand by the body. The FLCCC I-MASK+ protocol recommends 30 mg a day for prevention and 100 mg a day for early treatment of COVID-19. This should not be taken long term without evaluation of your zinc/copper ratios.

Where Can I Buy These Products?

Most of the quercetin, EGCG and zinc supplements are available at your local health stores and pharmacies. You can also buy them online from Amazon:

Other Potential Treatments

A summary table analysing more than 700 studies for COVID-19 treatments (credit: c19early.com)

Summary

The combination of quercetin, EGCG and zinc offer a high virus inhibiting potential with a valuable degree of safety at a time of great uncertainty. Quercetin, EGCG and zinc are also part of the FLCCC protocol and Zelenko protocol.

That said, they are not 'magic bullets' and you still need to follow other precautions (as advised by your local health authorities and doctors) in order to minimise your risk.


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